Category Archives: Aladay LLC Media

Humpday Fodder….

Organics Admin
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Organics Admin

COO at Aladay LLC
Organic Farmer, Property Preservation Specialist and Custom Glass & Wood Worker. Blogger extraordinaire...
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ALL QUIET ON THE WESTERN FRONT……

close your eyes....
close your eyes….

 

So what a goofy week it has been…I mean really the news about BofA cheating home owners out of their mortgages, which makes you really wonder, could the foreclosure crisis have been not quite as bad? I mean it did sort of financially cripple things for a bit. Then gas started going down so nobody would notice..not sure what we’re not supposed to notice, just had to get a bitch in about how fast gas is going up….Then there were the podcasts that gave fire to the story about SEAS new owner Brittany McDonald being Robert Kapeluch’s ex wife, which I believe were squelched the next day, but boy, was that some good fodder for the social media scene. Oh there was some timeline somewhere about that Miller fella and some gal from Miami Adrianna or something like that oh yeah and a baby…I think that’s it. Although we are speaking of the Property Preservation Industry, so ya never really know from one minute to the next. Ya never know whom is going to write you a stellar recommendation and then call themselves a liar.

Serious though the BoA thing is a biggie…and I don’t think we’ve seen the Last of this type of investigative findings…especially, when former employees say things like this;

“Bank of America’s practice is to string homeowners along with no apparent intention of providing the permanent loan modifications it promises,” said Erika Brown, one of the former employees. The damning evidence would spur a series of criminal investigations of BofA executives, if we still had a rule of law in this country for Wall Street banks

 

But this and what follows is a little disturbing especially since  the ones that witnessed these events are the ones talking.

“During a blitz, a single team would decline between 600 and 1,500 modification files at a time,” Wilson wrote. “I personally reviewed hundreds of files in which the computer systems showed that the homeowner had fulfilled a Trial Period Plan and was entitled to a permanent loan modification, but was nevertheless declined for a permanent modification during a blitz.” Employees were then instructed to make up a reason for the denial to submit to the Treasury Department, which monitored the program.

Employees “who placed ten or more accounts into foreclosure in a given month received a $500 bonus,” Gordon wrote. “Bank of America also gave employees gift cards to retail stores like Target or Bed Bath and Beyond as rewards for placing accounts into foreclosure.” Employees were closely monitored, and those who didn’t meet quotas, or who dared to give borrowers accurate information, were fired, as was anyone who “questioned the ethics … of declining loan modifications for false and fraudulent reasons,” according to William Wilson.

Read more:

Read the full affidavits from the active court case……………………………………Under Creative Commons License

The foregoing material was found on the CFLA web site

 

One would think that this scenario would not fall under the “Absense of Malice” rule of law…And to think…you go to jail for robbing the bank. I have stated for the past 8 years that banks knew exactly what they were doing. After-all, they have the brightest financial wizards working for them so they can interpret law to their advantage…Perhaps the Order Mills feel they are also entitled??? Now please donot forget that the toilet cleaners are the only ones that must have mandatory background checks, hhhmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm…

 

Which makes me ask…Would Fannie Mae, BofA, WFHM, Freddie…Ect…consider going locally instead of the failed experiment of out sourcing? Seriously, think about this for a minute. The Lender’s set up a state office with a couple satellite offices throughout said state. Then hire companies locally, so someone 3,000 miles away is not making decisions that violate local law…The local companies provide the labor and because there is no obscene layering of the area the company can actually hire from the community. It has been shown time and time again the best people to make decisions and do work are the people that live in the area…I believe some call that a pride thing.

But then issues could be properly addressed in a timely fashion. A lot faster than waiting three weeks to find out “The Client” wants it done yesterday and you have to immediately juggle schedules to accommodate this insane rush…neither here nor there HUH???? Oh I believe there would also be a sense of autonomy involved here and there.

Oh crap,,,I forgot about the paperwork thing that would mean that the mortgages would have to come home, it would also mean the mortgages couldn’t could not be sold…Gotta love Deregulation..Thanks Uncle Ronnie…

Hey I know that some of you are tuning in to read my interview with Robert Kapeluch, Director of Operations, and Brittany McDonald the New Owner of SEAS, or I believe South East Asset Services. I’m sorry to report the interview was cancelled for today and that Brittany did request we reschedule for sometime next week leading to all sort of speculations. However, that would be another article in and to itself….

Thinking out loud here but when the entire country is saying the Tiger is attempting to change its strips; wouldn’t you think the Tiger would want to dispel any negative Mojo that may want to tap on shoulder of said Tiger???

Even Little Man has been making inquiries…and boy can he be a pain in the….

Its life’s little dilemma’s like this when I’m reminded of a poem from my youth…

Two Irish men Two Irish men were digging in a ditch

One called the other a dirty son of a

Peter Murphy had a dog taught it how to jump…

Jumped up a ladies dress and bit her in the

Cocktails Ginger Ale 5 Cents a Glass..

If you don’t like my story, shove it up your…

Ask me no more questions I tell you no more Lies…

But if you get hit in the face with a bucket of shit…

Be sure to close your eyes…

 

Until Next Time

Happy Gardening

Think Strawberries…

Written By: Aaron Aveiro

Pruning your Fruit Trees

Organics Admin
Follow Me!!

Organics Admin

COO at Aladay LLC
Organic Farmer, Property Preservation Specialist and Custom Glass & Wood Worker. Blogger extraordinaire...
Organics Admin
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Latest posts by Organics Admin (see all)

Yes That time of year again….

250px-Apple_spur_M_D_Vaden
Apple Spur

 

With the East Coast and Mid-West still in the throes of winter. Out here on the West coast Spring is barreling its way towards us at a break neck pace. I thought I’d bring you information for the proper pruning of fruit trees and for that matter since spring is upon us and many Preservation companies like ours offer Spring Clean Up Services to the public. So the proper techniques and methods of pruning and trimming are important to the health of the tree and shrubs that you will be pruning and trimming.

The trimming and pruning of trees can be an excellent additional service to offer outside the confines of the Property Preservation Industry,(PPI). This is a service we have offered and provided clients long before we ever got involved in the PPI. We bill $25 per branch, yes that can add up very fast. So when you’re offering a service it is important to understand and have the proper knowledge and tools for the job. Tools we use are Pole saws, Anvil Pruners, Looping Shears, By-Pass Shears, and Bow Saws, and of course where necessary Chain Saws.

Fruit tree pruning is the cutting and removing of parts of a fruit tree. It covers a number of horticultural techniques that control growth, remove dead or diseased wood, and stimulate the formation of flowers and fruit buds. Pruning often means cutting branches back, sometimes removing smaller limbs entirely. It may also mean removal of young shoots, buds, leaves, etc. Careful attention to pruning and training young trees affects their later productivity and longevity. Good pruning and training can also prevent later injury from weak crotches (where a tree trunk splits into two or more branches) that break from the weight of fruit, snow, or ice on the branches.

To obtain a better understanding of how to prune plants properly, it is useful to have some underlying knowledge of how pruning works, and how it affects the way plants grow.

Plants form new tissue in an area called the meristem, located near the tips of roots and shoots, where active cell division takes place. Meristem growth is aimed at ensuring that leaves are quickly elevated into sunlight, and that roots are able to penetrate deeply into the soil. Once adequate height and length is achieved by the stems and roots, they begin to thicken to support the plant. On the shoots, these growing tips of the plant are called apical buds. The apical meristem (or tip) produces the growth hormone auxin, which not only promotes cell division, but also diffuses downwards and inhibits the development of lateral bud growth that otherwise competes with the apical tip for light and nutrients. Removing the apical tip and its suppressive hormone lets lower, dormant lateral buds develop, and the buds between the leaf stalk and stem produce new shoots that compete to become lead growth.

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Manipulating this natural response to damage (known as the principle of apical dominance) by processes such as pruning (as well as coppicing and pollarding) allows the arborist to determine the shape, size and productivity of many fruiting trees and bushes. The main aim when pruning fruit trees is usually to maximize fruit yield. Unpruned trees tend to produce large numbers of small fruits that may be difficult to reach when harvesting by hand. Branches can become broken by the weight of the crop, and the cropping may become biennial (that is, bearing fruit only every other year). Overpruned trees on the other hand tend to produce light crops of large, flavourless fruit that does not store well. Careful pruning balances shoot growth and fruit production.

Remember Proper Pruning is for the health of the trees not just the aesthetic value this services has.

  • Proper pruning is an important step in ensuring healthy, strong fruit trees.
  • Train fruit trees while young to avoid problems later.
  • Improperly pruned or neglected trees are more subject to disease organisms and breakage from fruit loads and storms.
  • Prune in late winter or early spring just before bud break.
  • Wound dressings are of no benefit in pruning and can even harbor disease organisms.

Proper training through correct pruning is important for a healthy, strong fruit tree. If a tree is properly trained from a young plant, it needs only moderate annual pruning when it reaches bearing age.

Young trees that are neglected will require removal of large branches later. This opens the tree to infectious disease organisms. Neglected trees also suffer more damage from fruit load and storm breakage than properly trained trees.

Pruning is best done in late winter or early spring just before bud break. Occasional summer and fall pruning may be needed, but keep it to a minimum. Avoid pruning in late spring and early summer when disease organisms have the best chance of invading pruning wounds.

Training and Pruning Fruit Trees

Quick Facts…

  • Proper pruning is an important step in ensuring healthy, strong fruit trees.
  • Train fruit trees while young to avoid problems later.
  • Improperly pruned or neglected trees are more subject to disease organisms and breakage from fruit loads and storms.
  • Prune in late winter or early spring just before bud break.
  • Wound dressings are of no benefit in pruning and can even harbor disease organisms.

Proper training through correct pruning is important for a healthy, strong fruit tree. If a tree is properly trained from a young plant, it needs only moderate annual pruning when it reaches bearing age.

Young trees that are neglected will require removal of large branches later. This opens the tree to infectious disease organisms. Neglected trees also suffer more damage from fruit load and storm breakage than properly trained trees.

Pruning is best done in late winter or early spring just before bud break. Occasional summer and fall pruning may be needed, but keep it to a minimum. Avoid pruning in late spring and early summer when disease organisms have the best chance of invading pruning wounds.

index

Training a Young Tree

Fruit trees often are obtained as bare-root whips or as packaged and container-grown sizes. Bare-root whips may have few or no branches. Following planting, remove the top of the whip about 1/4 inch above a bud that is located approximately 30 to 36 inches above the soil line (see Figure 1). This will cause branching.

If branches are already present, as is usually the case with container-grown trees, remove only dead, broken or interfering branches until the tree is established. Avoid the temptation to limb the tree up right after planting. It is important to leave as much healthy growth as possible the first year to provide foliage for food production. This is needed for root establishment.

In the second year, select the branches that are well-spaced up and down the plant and leave these. Remove all other branches, particularly when they interfere with each other, arise from the trunk close to the same point, or have acute, upright crotches. These last tend to develop “included bark” as the tree grows. Such branches will be weak and fail under heavy fruit loads or snows.

In subsequent years, select additional strong branches and remove weak and interfering ones. It also may be necessary to remove some lower branches that were left earlier.

When removing any branch, large or small, avoid stubs and cuts close to the trunk. As a guideline, look for a bark ridge located in the branch crotch. You also will find that most branches have a slight swelling or “collar” at their base. Avoid cutting into this because that will destroy a natural protection or boundary in the tree.

If at all possible, avoid cutting back tops (except in the young whips). This cuts into stems (trunks) and opens the tree to infection.

Pruning Older Trees

Avoid pruning any more than necessary. Some pruning books urge “topping” older trees to stimulate young, productive wood. This practice, however, not only leads to the development of weak shoots, but invariably opens a tree to numerous disease and wood-rotting organisms. Canker diseases such as Cytospora, common in peaches, and bacterial diseases, such as fire blight in apple and pear, are perpetuated through unnecessary and improper pruning.

Occasional thinning of branches (never the tops or branch tips) may be necessary. Undercut large branches to prevent bark-stripping when the branch falls. Then remove most of the branch weight with a cut outside of the undercut.

Wound Dressings

It is tempting to apply a wound dressing to a pruning cut. This age-old practice, however, has been shown by several research scientists to be of no benefit to the tree and can even harbor disease organisms.

Wound dressings are sometimes desirable for aesthetics, to hide or camouflage the exposed wound. If this is the case, use the type of material in aerosol cans available at garden centers. Apply a thin coat. It should barely coat the wound, changing its color but not forming a thick, black film.

Foregoing information authored by: J.R. Feucht and H. Larsen (9/09) J.R. Feucht, former Colorado State University Extension landscape plants specialist and professor, horticulture. 9/99.

For more information on our Spring Clean Up Service please go here

Sources: Colorado State University Extension & Wikipedia

Photos Courtesy Wikipedia and Google Images.

Written By: Aaron Aveiro and noted authors.